• Covid-19 – click here for the latest updates from Forum Events & Media Group Ltd

    PA Life PA Life PA Life PA Life PA Life


      Brits wouldn’t tell their boss they’ve won the lottery

      • 0

      Contrary to the belief that most people would hand in their notice as soon as they found out they’d won the lottery, a staggering 83% of Brits say they wouldn’t tell their boss they’d hit the jackpot.

      A survey of 2,000 workers conducted by online gaming site WinkSlots.com also reveals that only 8% would tell their manager how much they had won. Meanwhile, nearly half (46%) would confide in their colleagues, with a third willing to admit the value of their lottery win despite the risk of gossip or jealousy.

      Surprisingly, more than a third would continue working even if they won a substantial amount of money. Using the cushion of extra cash as an excuse, 11% would retrain for a new career, while one in five saying they’d move to the digital media industry. Other popular work re-directions include film (18%), travel (16%), music (14%), sports (9%) and science (8%). One in six would work for a charity.

      Showing a desire to make even more money, a quarter of those surveyed would invest their lottery winnings in a business, with property being the most popular choice (27%) followed by banking and finance (19%), hospitality (18%), automotive (14%), tourism and leisure (14%) and information technology (6%).

      A Wink Slots spokesperson commented: “Although most industry competition tends to be amongst colleagues, it is interesting to see that the majority of Britons would rather disclose news about an out-of-work financial gain with a co-worker over their boss.

      “It is however great to see that Brits enjoy their jobs so much that they would continue working despite their windfall, and that some would even use the opportunity to retrain or volunteer their time for charity.

      “The amount we would want to win before giving up our day job shows that we are cautious and tend to think long term when it comes to retirement – we want to ensure we have enough money to last through the years before entirely giving up work.”

      Would you tell your colleagues if you’d won the lottery? What about your boss? Would you quit your job? Let us know on TwitterFacebook or LinkedIn

    • Avatar
      AUTHOR

      Molly Dyson

      Former Editor – PA Life

      All stories by: Molly Dyson